Members Login
Username 
 
Password 
    Remember Me  
Post Info TOPIC: Traces of radioactivity found on two British Airways planes


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 2289
Date:
Traces of radioactivity found on two British Airways planes
Permalink Closed


Intriguing!!


Once again reminds you of the days of the Cold War.


http://www.iht.com/articles/2006/11/29/news/spy.php
Traces of radioactivity found on two British Airways planes
By Alan Cowell / The New York TimesPublished: November 29, 2006


 LONDON: In yet another new and baffling twist in the suspected radiation poisoning of a former Russian agent in London, British Airways said Wednesday that three of its planes used on routes between London and Moscow had been tested for radioactivity.


The airline said "very low traces" of radioactivity had been found so far on the two of the planes, all Boeing 767s, at least one of which flew between London and Moscow several days before the former agent, Alexander Litvinenko, complained of feeling unwell.


It was not clear how the traces of radioactivity got onto the British Airways planes, and British Airways did not say that the planes had been used to transport radioactive material.


Litvinenko died in a London hospital late Thursday and a radioactive isotope, polonium 210, was found in his urine. An autopsy is to be carried out Friday. The British Airways statement did not allude specifically to polonium 210 but did link the Litvinenko case directly to the examination of its planes.


According to Litvinenko's supporters, he began to feel ill Nov. 1, the same day that he met an Italian contact in a sushi bar and two Russians in a five-star hotel. Traces of radiation have been found in those places and others visited by Litvinenko on that day, the police said.


According to the British Airways statement, three of the four routes flown by the planes being examined took place before Nov. 1. The flights were BA 875 Moscow-London on Oct. 25, BA 872 London-Moscow on Oct. 28 and BA 873 on Oct. 31, the airline said. The fourth flight was BA 874 London- Moscow on Nov. 3.


The earlier flights on Oct. 25 and Oct. 28 were flown by the same airplane while two different planes were used for the two subsequent flights. British Airways said in a statement that it had investigated those flights because the police had said "individuals involved in the Litvinenko case" had flown on them.


It was the first time that a physical link has been suggested with Moscow - Litvinenko accused the authorities there of responsibility for his poisoning - and the first time that traces of radioactivity predating Nov. 1 have been found. That could suggest that Litvinenko had ingested or inhaled radioactive material before Nov. 1.


"Purely on a precautionary basis, scientific teams have been testing a number of locations identified as part of the police investigation over the last few days," a British Airways spokesman said, speaking in return for anonymity under company policy.


"Today they have started tests on two aircraft at Heathrow Airport and are making arrangements for a third plane to be tested."


The statement from the airline said: "BA has been advised that three of its Boeing 767 short-haul aircraft have been identified by the U.K. Government as part of the investigation into the death of Alexander Litvinenko."


"The airline was contacted last night by the government. It has taken the three Boeing 767s out of service to enable forensic examination to be carried out. The initial results of the forensic tests, which was confirmed late this afternoon, has shown very low traces of a radioactive substance onboard two of the three aircraft," the statement said.


"British Airways has been advised that this investigation is confined solely to these three Boeing 767 aircraft, which will remain out of service until further notice. British Airways understands that from advice it has been given, the risk to public health is low," the statement said.
 



-- Edited by karatecatman at 13:26, 2006-11-30

__________________
KCM


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 2289
Date:
Permalink Closed

Copyright British Airways


A list of British Airways flights served by grounded planes


The Associated Press and Seattle Times travel staff


British Airways has grounded three Boeing 767s after low traces of radiation were found aboard two of them; the third plane is being tested. The contamination is linked to the death of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko, who died from radiation poisoning and had traveled on British Airways flights. .


The airline recommends that travelers who were aboard the following flights, between London and Western European cities, Moscow and Istanbul, contact their doctors. It said that the risk to passengers is low.


The airline has some information on its Web site at www.britishairways.com Phone lines also have been set up for passengers on the affected flights (see the list below) officials. From outside Britain, phone 011-44-191-211-3690. Within the United Kingdom, phone 0845-6040171.


London Heathrow to Moscow/ Moscow to London Heathrow


Oct. 25, BA875


Oct. 26, BA872 and BA873


Oct. 28, BA872 and BA873


Oct. 31, BA874 and BA875


Nov. 3, BA874 and BA875


Nov. 7, BA872 and BA873


 
 
 
Nov. 8, BA874 and BA875


Nov. 9, BA872 and BA873


Nov. 14, BA872 and BA873


Nov. 15, BA874 and BA875


Nov. 16, BA872 and BA873


Nov. 17, BA874 and BA875


Nov. 18, BA874 and BA875


Nov. 20, BA872 and BA873


Nov. 22, BA872 and BA873


Nov. 25, BA872 and BA873


Nov. 28, BA872 and BA873


London Heathrow to Barcelona/Barcelona to London Heathrow


Nov. 4, BA478 and BA479


Nov. 16, BA478 and BA479


Nov. 17, BA478 and BA479


Nov. 19, BA478 and BA479


Nov. 20, BA478 and BA479


Nov. 21, BA478 and BA479


Nov. 22, BA478 and BA479


Nov. 23, BA478 and BA479


Nov. 24, BA478 and BA479


London Heathrow to Dusseldorf/Dusseldorf to London Heathrow


Oct. 30, BA936 and BA937


Nov. 6, BA936 and BA937


Nov. 18, BA936 and BA937


Nov. 19, BA936 and BA937


Nov. 24, BA936 and BA937


Nov. 25, BA936 and BA937


Nov. 27, BA936 and BA937


London Heathrow to Athens


Oct. 30, BA632


Nov, 6, BA632


Nov. 7, BA634


Nov. 9, BA634


Nov. 10, BA632


Nov. 14, BA634


Nov. 19, BA632


Nov. 20, BA634


Nov. 21, BA632


Nov. 22, BA634


Nov 24, BA632


Nov. 25, BA632


Nov. 27, BA632


Nov. 28, BA634


Athens to London Heathrow


Oct. 30, BA633


Nov. 6, BA633


Nov. 8, BA631


Nov. 10, BA631


Nov. 10, BA633


Nov. 15, BA631


Nov. 19, BA633


Nov. 21, BA631


Nov. 21, BA633


Nov. 23, BA631


Nov. 24, BA633


Nov. 25, BA633


Nov. 27, BA633


London Heathrow to Larnaca/Larnaca to London Heathrow


Oct. 29, BA662 and BA663


Nov. 11, BA662 and BA663


Nov. 12, BA662 and BA663


Nov. 13, BA662 and BA663


Nov. 18, BA662 and BA663


Nov. 26, BA662 and BA663


London Heathrow to Stockholm/Stockholm to London Heathrow


Nov. 19, BA780 and BA781


Nov. 22, BA780 and BA781


Nov. 23, BA780 and BA781


Nov. 24, BA780 and BA781


London Heathrow to Vienna/Vienna to London Heathrow


Nov. 28, BA846 and BA847


London Heathrow to Frankfurt


Oct. 26, BA916


Frankfurt to London Heathrow


Oct. 27, BA901


London Heathrow to Istanbul/Istanbul to London Heathrow


Oct. 27, BA676 and BA677


London Heathrow to Madrid/Madrid to London Heathrow


Nov. 26, BA460 and BA461



__________________
KCM


Member

Status: Offline
Posts: 2289
Date:
BA planes undergo radiation tests
Permalink Closed


BA planes undergo radiation tests Two British Airways planes are to undergo further detailed examination after traces of a radioactive substance were discovered on board.

The traces were found by scientists involved in investigating the death of ex-spy Alexander Litvinenko. An inquest into the death opens today.

BA said a third plane is grounded in Moscow awaiting tests.

The airline is trying to make contact with 33,000 passengers who travelled on affected flights.

People are being advised to check the flight details published on the BA website and to contact NHS Direct or a special helpline number if they travelled on the named flights.

Advice

A spokeswoman for BA said the airline had also been "proactively calling passengers" and hoped to have contacted the majority before the end of Thursday.

An estimated 3,000 staff would also need to be checked, BA said.








DESTINATIONS AFFECTED
Moscow
Barcelona
Dusseldorf
Athens
Larnaca
Stockholm
Vienna
Frankfurt
Istanbul
Madrid All flight numbers published on the BA website

Mr Litvinenko, an ex-KGB agent and a fierce critic of Russian president Vladimir Putin, died last week of radiation poisoning.

Traces of radioactive polonium-210 were discovered in his body and more traces of the substance were found at venues he visited in the capital on 1 November.

Scotland Yard has not said why it became interested in the planes, which were used on flights to Moscow and other European destinations over a five-week period.

But detectives are known to be tracing the movements of those who associated with Mr Litvinenko.

The BBC's Richard Galpin said the traces could be there from anyone who had been in contact with Mr Litvinenko, or could have come from someone bringing the substance to the UK.

The alert involves 221 flights made by the three short-haul 767s in Europe between 25 October and 29 November.

British Airways chief executive Willie Walsh told the BBC that the aircraft affected were all of the same type, and were being carefully examined.








EXPOSURE RISK
Contact with carrier's sweat or urine could lead to exposure
But polonium-210 must be ingested to cause damage
Radiation has very short range and cannot pass through skin
Washing eliminates traces

"Three specific aircraft were initially identified - three 767s," he said. "Two of those aircraft have been tested, and very low levels of radioactive traces have been discovered on the aircraft."

Mr Walsh said that the aircraft had made a large number of flights since they were contaminated, carrying many thousands of passengers, and the company was trying to alert them all.

"In total, there are 221 flights involved, involving the three aircraft. We estimate that there are 33,000 passengers involved."

Low risk

The chief executive of Britain's Health Protection Agency, Prof Pat Troop, said that if the source of the radiation was the same as that which killed Mr Litvinenko - polonium-210 - the risk of serious contamination to passengers was small.

"What we have heard is that it's either traces or very low levels and what we have learnt so far in our investigation... is that where we have got these areas of low level radiation it doesn't seem to pose a significant health threat."

The inquest into Mr Litvinenko's death is due to open today at St Pancras Coroner's Court.

However, it will be adjourned until the police investigation into his death has been completed.

Home Secretary John Reid is expected to make a statement to Parliament concerning the investigation today.



  • British Airways has set up a special helpline for customers in the UK on 0845 6040171 or 0191 211 3690 for international calls.


  • Passengers who travelled on those flights and want further advice are advised to telephone NHS Direct on 0845 4647.







  • Story from BBC NEWS:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/uk/6158473.stm

    Published: 2006/11/30 05:27:07 GMT

    BBC


    __________________
    KCM


    Member

    Status: Offline
    Posts: 2289
    Date:
    RE: Traces of radioactivity found on two British Airways planes
    Permalink Closed


    http://www.flightglobal.com/Articles/2006/11/30/Navigation/177/210858/British+Airways+to+contact+up+to+300,000+passengers+in+radioactive+contamination+fear+as+it.html  



    Max Kingsley-Jones / Flight 



    British Airways to contact up to 300,000 passengers in radioactive contamination fear as it identifies three Boeing 767s grounded in Russian spy poisoning police probe

    British Airways to contact up to 300,000 passengers in radioactive contamination fear as it identifies three Boeing 767s grounded in Russian spy poisoning police probe By David Kaminski-Morrow
    The UK government has revealed that as many as 30,000 people who travelled on three British Airways Boeing 767-300ERs within Europe over a five-week period in late October and this month are being contacted over fears of possible radioactive contamination linked to the death of a former Russian spy in London last week.


    British Airways has identified the three Boeing 767-300ER aircraft grounded for forensic tests in connection with the continuing UK government investigation into the death of Alexander Litvinenko, a former agent of the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB), a sucessor to the Soviet-era  KGB. Litvinenko died in London on 23 November and had been admitted to hospital days before, suffering the effects of contact with a radioactive isotope identified as polonium-210a former Russian secret agent in London.


    All three Rolls-Royce RB211-powered aircraft are owned by the UK flag-carrier.


    The oldest of the twin-jets, registered G-BNWB, is a 16-year old example. BA has also confirmed the temporary grounding of a 12-year old aircraft, G-BNWX, and an eight-year old jet, G-BZHA. The 767 pictured below is not part of the investigation.


    Two of the aircraft have been kept on the ground at London Heathrow while the third is at Moscow Domodedovo airport. Initial tests on the aircraft have revealed that at least two of the 767s have been in contact with a radioactive substance.


    The government contacted BA over the matter two days ago and the extent of the investigation has been limited to these three jets.


    BA has since identified dozens of flights conducted by the aircraft on routes between London and Moscow, Dusseldorf, Frankfurt, Athens, Barcelona, Larnaca, Stockholm, Warsaw, Istanbul and Madrid between 25 October and 29 November.


    While it believes that any risk to passengers is low, the carrier has advised passengers who travelled on the flights concerned to seek medical advice and the carrier is working to contact thousands of passengers who travelled on the 767s over the past five weeks after traces of radioactivity were found on two of the aircraft.


     





    -- Edited by karatecatman at 15:43, 2006-11-30

    __________________
    KCM


    Member

    Status: Offline
    Posts: 1632
    Date:
    Permalink Closed

    How many Pax could be affected.Also Is there any Equipment to detect Radiation levels on Persons at Airports when travelling as Pax.Staff working around Radioactive Equipment at Hospitals do have a Radiation badge attached on themselves though.


    regds


    MEL



    __________________
    Think of the Brighter Side !!!


    Member

    Status: Offline
    Posts: 2450
    Date:
    Permalink Closed

    Someone please clear my doubt... What do they mean by aircraft having radioactive substances? If thats true then almost 99% passengers will be have been afeected by it...


    Else if the Russian Spy's food or some other drinks he must have taken on-board could have been poisoned by some cabin crew or someone... since this death is quite a high level case and we know many cases where popluar people have been killed in similar ways like their food or drinks in hotels have been poisoned etc...


    Just my



    __________________
    Light travels faster than sound...thats why people appear bright, until you hear them talk!


    Member

    Status: Offline
    Posts: 599
    Date:
    Permalink Closed

    HAWK21M wrote:



    How many Pax could be affected.Also Is there any Equipment to detect Radiation levels on Persons at Airports when travelling as Pax.Staff working around Radioactive Equipment at Hospitals do have a Radiation badge attached on themselves though.


    regds


    MEL





    that radiation badge detects exposure over a period of months, and would be of no help at airports.  But, after all these incidents, I'd expect LHR to have systems in place.  Maybe the amount of radiation this time was too small to pose any threat to airlines, and so the instrument installed were not configured to detect such small amount of radioactivity.


    rgds


    VT-ASJ



    __________________
    Vive Le YYZ


    Member

    Status: Offline
    Posts: 1632
    Date:
    Permalink Closed

    the_380 wrote:



    Someone please clear my doubt... What do they mean by aircraft having radioactive substances? If thats true then almost 99% passengers will be have been afeected by it...






    The Desitometer [certain type] on B757s are Radioative if Exposed.But normally sealed & in the Fuel tank.


    regds


    MEL



    __________________
    Think of the Brighter Side !!!
    Page 1 of 1  sorted by
     
    Quick Reply

    Please log in to post quick replies.

    Tweet this page Post to Digg Post to Del.icio.us


    Create your own FREE Forum
    Report Abuse
    Powered by ActiveBoard